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Saturday, June 12, 2004

Lost In Translation

I just watched a movie called Lost In Translation, starring Bill Murray. It made me sad. Do not continue reading if you haven't seen it and plan on seeing it, as I'm giong to be telling you all about it.



Bill played an actor getting old, not able to get work in America, so he's in Tokyo doing a whiskey commercial for 2 million dollars. However, he can't understand the language, and the people are strange. He's bored and alone, with his family back in America. We quickly learn that he forgets his kids' birthday and he can't be bothered giving his wife an answer about what colour the new carpet in his study should be.

While at the hotel in Tokyo he meets a young girl called Charlotte, who's probably about 23-24 as she's only just graduated 2 years previously. She's in Tokyo with her husband, who's a photographer. He was sent there on assignment and she tagged along. While he's out doing the photographing, we quickly find out that he ignores her. They've been married 2 years, and she's wondering if it was the right thing to do.

Her and Bill meet in the bar, and during the course of the movie they hang out together, mainly because they're both American and both alone in Japan. Lonely too.

The movie takes place over a week, and in that time their relationship gets closer. However, they don't engage in any of the normal aspects of a blossoming relationship. It's like they're friends, as close as friends could be without it being sexual.

But the chemistry develops, and before we know it, it's time for him to leave and go back to America. He doesn't want to leave though, and she tells him to stay and they'll start a jazz band. They laugh it off, knowing that they're both married and that could never be. Or could it?

He has a discussion with his wife, who talks about the kids missing him but they're getting used to him being gone. He tells her he wants to change, and become healthier, eating less fatty foods like the Japanese. She tells him he should stay in Japan, and he'd be able to have it every day. He says nothing. She asks him if she should be worried, and he says 'only if you want to'. She says she has to go and she'll "see you... talk to you later." There's little love there. He hangs up, and sinks into the bath, thinking.

After some more time going out and getting closer still, eventually there's a goodbye between him and Charlotte. However it's shallow, without any expressed feeling, as there are Japanese people around waiting to say their goodbyes and see him off to the airport, but as she walks away, sorry to go, he looks after her, sorry that he's going.

As the taxi begins taking him to the airport, he sees her walking along a street, and he jumps out and follows her. Catching up, he calls out her name and she turns around. They stand there looking at each other, and then they hug. He says something to her that we can't hear, but she seems happy. She says ok, and they kiss for the first time. They smile lovingly at each other and he goes back to his cab.

As he's in the car he looks energised, and excited about the future. He smiles, his eyes gleaming, and he looks the happiest and most excited we've seen him during the movie.

The end.



I was originally disappointed with the ending of the movie, because I didn't know what he said to her, and I didn't think there was a resolution. However, during the writing of it above, I realised that what he must have said to her was that he'll be back for her, and she said ok. He was energised because he was going home to end his marriage, and then return to see her.

I felt much better about the movie upon realising that.

But anyway, what made me sad? It was the theme of going through your life wondering if the choices you've made are the right ones, and are the people you marry the ones you're meant to be with.

It made me feel sad because I saw a future possibility of myself in Bill Murray's character. Being with someone I love for years, and then waking up one day and realising I didn't love them any more, and realising that I wasn't happy with my life.

I don't want to be in that position myself one day. I don't want to wake up one day and wonder what I've been doing with my life.

In some respects, I feel like that already, and I don't want it to continue in the future. I'm feeling a little lost and alone right now, which I didn't realise until the movie inspired the feelings in me.

I'll talk more about it another time.

Posted on 6/12/2004 07:42:00 PM Backlinks


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